Anyone who knows me knows I have a ridiculous sweet tooth and the city of Brussels, Belgium is the ideal place to come ready to indulge your sweet tooth. From some of the world’s finest chocolates to the best-tasting beer, it can easily be one of the tastiest trips you’ll ever have.

While the city does have its share of historical sites to see, it’s also a chocolate lover’s delight. There are literally hundreds of chocolate shops in the city of Brussels, as well as multiple museums to tour. Take a break from the traditional sightseeing and touring of historical landmarks, such as the Grand Palace and the Notre Dame du Sablon, in favor of a day spent exploring one of the many chocolate museums, like Musée du Cacao et du Chocolat.

I’ve always been a huge fan of waffles. Being from Canada we’ve been known for our Maple Syrup. Trust me it’s legendary. Prior to my visit to Bonn, Germany to hang with my cousin, I asked what she wanted me to bring and she replied something distinctly Canadian. My first thought, Maple Syrup. I’m not talking that grocery store, Aunt Jemima, maple flavored stuff, I’m talking that; drive up north, tap a maple tree, freshly bottled stuff. My point…Nothing beats maple syrup on waffles. That is until I had waffles in Brussels. Oh, my f**king word. Although there are waffle trucks all around the city like we have ice-cream trucks. I suggest heading down to the main square and trying one of the waffles with various toppings from one of the many waffle shops. My favorite waffle actually came from a waffle shop inside the main train station. I think locals eat waffles like we eat donuts.

Let’s take a second to dive into the savory side of things with a local favorite. Deep-fried chipped potatoes, are very popular in the city of Brussels and Belgium, where they are thought to have originated. They were first mentioned in a book called Curiosités de la table dans les Pays-Bas-Belgiques which was written in 1781. Mentioned in the book, inhabitants around the Meuse River had been eating fried potatoes since 1680. We in the West know them as “French Fries” but it is argued that during the First World War American soldiers believed they were being served fries in France. They are often served with a variety of sauces and traditionally, they are served in a “cornet de frites” (French) or “puntzak” (Dutch), a cone-shaped white piece of cardboard then wrapped in a piece of paper, with the sauce on the top.

Interesting side notes: Majority of Belgian households have a deep fryer, which enables them to make their own fries and other deep-fried foods at home.

Lastly, let’s talk The best beer in Belgiumif there is such a thing 🙂

 

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About Me:
Using the latest travel apps, technology, and gear, I take a city; see the sights, taste the food, smell the roses, hear the stories and feel the love. All in 48 hours. Then, using videography & editing, photography and writing I retell and share those stories with my readers and viewers.

I'm Christopher Rudder and welcome to Rudderless Travel.

Read more about me here: Being Rudderless With Christopher Rudder and here: Rudderless Travel gets nominated for the Leibster Award.

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